Tuesday, March 9, 2010

dictionary; Bare subjunctive; no future tense; percent per cent

http://groups.google.com/group/alt.usage.english/msg/af2a9c6d2764e3eb
"2.  Definitions in dictionaries are generalized from ...."

==============================
Bare subjunctive: a ...
==============================
50 Years of Stupid Grammar Advice

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoffrey_K._Pullum

http://groups.google.com/group/alt.usage.english/browse_thread/thread/53d7d4b84ca47207#

---------------
Alternative views can be seen here--

http://mleddy.blogspot.com/2009/04/pullum-on-strunk-and-white.html


======================
https://groups.google.com/d/topic/alt.usage.english/zjn2DXkle40/discussion
[quote Franke]
Try: Quirk, Greenbaum, Leech, and Svartvick's _A Comprehensive Grammar of the
English Language_ (Longman, 1985).

English has only two tenses, Present and Past. ....
[end quote]

http://groups.google.com/group/alt.usage.english/browse_thread/thread/2f04374ab95b93fb#
11 sentences in question.
"English, having no true future tense, usually..."

---
http://books.google.com/books?id=e1s6uGQzAsMC&lpg=PA229&ots=A6YCVZeOGI&dq=%22morphologically%20English%20has%20no%20future%20form%20of%20the%20verb%20in%20addition%20to%20present%22&pg=PA230#v=onepage&q=%22morphologically%20English%20has%20no%20future%20form%20of%20the%20verb%20in%20addition%20to%20present%22&f=false
or
http://tinyurl.com/d424w42
(two different views from linguists: "no future tense" vs "a future tense")



======================
http://groups.google.com/group/alt.usage.english/msg/c112451a9765cab5
" I would say simply that "percent" is the usual modern spelling and "per cent" is old-fashioned.  (In still older usage the spelling was "per cent." -- it was considered an abbreviation of the Latin phrase "per centum".)" (by M.B.)