Sunday, August 8, 2010

Lexicographic error; a friend of (double possessive/of possessive)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lexicographic_error
"A lexicographic error is an inaccurate entry in a dictionary."

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線上字典勘誤


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possessive, double
http://www.randomhouse.com/wotd/index.pperl?date=19990305
a nephew of John
(rather than "a nephew of John's")

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(In my google docs)
of-double-possessive.pdf
"McGrawl-Hill's essential ESL Grammar"
Double Possessive
He is a friend of (name)
He is a friend of (name)'s

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http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/grammarlogs/grammarlogs8.htm
"She is a friend of Harry"

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http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/grammarlogs2/grammarlogs308.htm
[quote]However, all the writing manuals I own say that "a friend of my mother's" is idiomatically acceptable.[end quote]

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http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/grammarlogs3/grammarlogs414.htm
"a friend of my (uncle/uncle's)"

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http://www.google.com/search?client=ubuntu&channel=fs&q=site%3Agrammar.ccc.commnet.edu+%22a+friend+of%22&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8


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http://groups.google.com/group/alt.usage.english/browse_thread/thread/1cde33ead436f42d/ae32a4d41bfab812
John is a friend of Bill/Bill's

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http://groups.google.com/group/alt.usage.english/browse_thread/thread/2b4a79f0ae2d51a7/f9b9746e9d91fe4c
A friend of Stan/Stan's
R.L.: "The possessive
form is more common in American English (and possibly in British
English as well; I just don't know) than the alternative without the
's. .... In some cases you have to use the possessive to differentiate
one meaning from another; compare "A bone of the dog" and "A bone of
the dog's."

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http://groups.google.com/group/alt.usage.english/browse_thread/thread/b66e11b611fe110a/95c0fb381d4702c6
a friend of George/George's

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http://groups.google.com/group/alt.usage.english/browse_thread/thread/e9f6644d3caa3173#
a friend of John/John's
E.K.: (Note: this is what I'm familiar with)
In the US, a "Friend of John" could well imply that John was some
high-ranking individual and the person being described had no official
position but was known to have a fair amount of influence because of
his personal friendship with John.  I think that this started with
(Friends of) Bill Clinton in the early '90s.  Where I worked, "Friend
of Joel" and (later) "Friend of Dick" (where Joel and Dick were heads
of Labs) were often heard informal titles for certain people.
Note ....
S.H.:
They have different meanings, .....
A "friend of John's" is someone John has friended.

A "friend of John" is someone who has friended John, but John has not
necessarily reciprocated. 
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http://groups.google.com/group/misc.education.language.english/browse_thread/thread/481b66d8b0adfab/83c007a8ef9fd470?lnk=gst&q=double+possessive#83c007a8ef9fd470

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http://groups.google.com/group/alt.usage.english/search?group=alt.usage.english&q=%22a+friend+of%22&qt_g=Search+this+group